Rebland Wine Region

A region for all tastes!

The Rebland, the home of Baden-Baden’s vineyards, is synonymous for fine wines and culinary delights: a picturesque, sun blessed vineyard landscape, southwest of Baden-Baden, with splendid views of the Rhine Valley and the Black Forest. It only happens to be a stone’s throw from the casino and the Kurhaus, yet it seems like an excursion to another world. Experience the region for yourself.  

Winegrowing Tradition

The Romans were the first to cultivate vines on the sheltered slopes, southwest of Baden-Baden, back in the 3rd century. And according to legend, they really were quite partial to a drop or two! On their departure, the monks took over the vineyards and ensured that the region’s wine growing tradition continued.

The Steinbach monks, for example, were not just accomplished brewers and cultivators; they were also most knowledgeable in the art of wine making. They even succeeded in making their wine a sought after commodity, often storing it for up to 10 years in the village’s cool, underground vaults, before selling it. Even when vine cultivation suffered, due to war and depredation, the monks always saw fit to keep the tradition alive. At one point, when the vines in the Umweg region of Steinbach had become exhausted, the Lichtental Abbey purchased 8,000 new grapevines to regenerate the area.

Baden-Baden and its wines

Today the main grape varieties in the Rebland are Riesling (52%), Pinot Noir (32%) and Müller-Thurgau (5%).

Riesling

Rieslings has been grown in the Rebland region for a very long time – Even the Romans started with growing of white wine approximately 2000 years ago. The Riesling, the typical wine of the Rebland region, is a wine of great complexity and elegance. The aromas and flavours range from citrus to ripe peaches. Fruit, acid and the harmonious arrangement between the residual sugar and the acid are the hallmark of the Riesling. Riesling is a good partner for light meats and seafood. The fruity character also harmonizes with spicy, sweet-and-sour Asian kitchen. 

Bocksbeutel

The “BOCKSBEUTEL” is a bottle-form of which the origin is still not known. In Baden-Baden wine has been filled in these bottles for over 200 years and still there are two theories regarding the special form of the bottle:

The first theory stems from the centurylong belief that wine gives strength to body and soul. Monks, nuns and other religious dignitaries also shared this view and were known to carry a container of wine with them at all times. An extra source of inspiration, one could say, to help them through their busy day! This, they stored in their prayer book pouch, known in German as a “Buchbeutel” or “Booksbüdel”. The name for this compact bottle is therefore thought to have derived from these terms.

The second theory comes from the middle ages; a time when people didn’t exactly mince their words! Legend has it that the bottle  received its name as a result of its remarkable similarity in shape to that of a goat’s scrotum!

Until nowadays there are only two regions which are allowed to fill their high-quality wine in these typical bottles, the “Booksbeutel”: Baden-Baden and Franconia.

Pinot Noir

The bouquet of the Pinot Noir reminds of dark berry berries and cherries. The taste is full-bodied and well rounded. The Pinot Noir acquires an exceptionally interesting touch when it is matures in a small wooden barrel, called “Barrique”. The combination of the fruit and wooden aromas produces wines of a truly international standard.

Ice-Wine

When producing Ice-Wine the grapes will be harvested in a temperature of at least minus 8° degrees Celsius. The frozen grapes must be spread immediately. The ice remains back in the berries during the pressing, only the emerging juice will be fermented.

The characteristic of ice-wine is the connection of concentrated sweet and high acid. This makes the ice-wine to an impressing “meditation wine” and to a companion of noble desserts, especially pastry.


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