Stiftskirche (Collegiate Church)

View from the Chancel of the Nave, around 1870;  The Stiftskirche from the north-east, around 1910

The Catholic Parish Church of St. Peter and St. Paul was a Collegiate Church from the 15th until the early 19th centuries, and is still called that today. By 1431 at the latest, the church was the burial ground of the Margraves of Baden until the Baden-Baden line died out in 1771.

An imperial document of 987 first mentions a church in this spot.

The most important remaining part of the late Romanesque church, which was first mentioned in 1245, is the West Tower which dates back to the first half of the 13th century.

The appearance of the church has changed numerous times as the result of refurbishments, and also after being destroyed in the city fire of 1689.

The most remarkable interior features of the church today include a filigree tabernacle of around 1490 and a larger-than-life crucifix by the leading sculptor Niclaus Gerhaert von Leyden of 1467.


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